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Chapter 13 Topics
Back to General guide
The Chapter 7 Program explained
What happens in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy?
Which debts will be discharged?
Will all debts be discharged?
If I receive property after filing?
What will it cost?

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Will all debts be discharged?

A. 1. Debts not discharged at all: The following debts are not discharged in any type of bankruptcy, and you will continue to owe these debts even after your bankruptcy: debts not listed on your bankruptcy; debts for which you have no mailing address or only an incorrect address; fines; most debts for taxes; most debts for student loans; some debts resulting from drunken driving; child support debts; and debts for alimony. 

2. Debts which may cause problems: Debts involving fraud, larceny, misrepresentations, embezzlement, or a willful injury to creditors or their property are almost always discharged in a Chapter 13 bankruptcy, and are usually discharged In a Chapter 7 bankruptcy as well. However, a creditor may object to the discharge of these debts in a Chapter 7 bankruptcy. Although such an objection by a creditor is very rare, it requires a lengthy and expensive hearing in Bankruptcy Court in Youngstown, Cleveland or Akron. 

3. People sometimes have debts like these which may occasionally cause problems: 1) large frequent charges made on credit cards prior to filing bankruptcy; 2) credit cards or loans where you made incomplete or incorrect statements o n the application for the account; or  3) secured debts like Sears where you recently purchased furniture or appliances and then later sold those items of collateral.